K – 2nd Grade

Book Cover & QuiltTitleAuthor/IllustratorSynopsisTopicsLesson Plan

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A Name on the QuiltAuthor: Jeannine Atkins
Illustrator: Tad Hills
Quiltmaker: Laurie Stoner
Atkins offers a simple way to discuss the issues concerning AIDS, death, and homosexuality through the story of one family's efforts to make a section for the AIDS Memorial Quilt project. The story is told by Lauren, a young girl whose Uncle Ron passed away. Her parents, younger brother, grandmother, and Ron's roommate and friends gather to work on a quilt panel. Using scraps of clothing and fabric with colors and pattern that remind them of Uncle Ron, the family is grieving and doing something positive to remember and celebrate the life of a loved one.AIDS Memoria
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Addy's Wedding Quilt
Author: Connie Porter & Dahl Taylor
Illustrator: Susan McAliley
Quiltmaker: Margaret Osmulski
Addy's been sewing for weeks and she was going to put some new applique's in the quilt. Miss Dunn, her new teacher, would be teaching her some new embroidery skills. Addy knew that she couldn't tell the thread with color from the knowledge of the quilt, but an army of elephants couldn't have done a better job than Addy did. Addy called out a letter of the alphabet and her judgments when Harriet called out to her knowledge. To turn her book Harriet, she jumped past her self satisfied smirk. Addy's folks got married on the plantation and now they are getting married again. Addy's question was to simply ask who spoke about getting married in the church. Momma and Poppa want to get married in the church, so they can stay together. Where was she telling Poppa's broom handle from the old cuff and the broom straw from the hem of a dress? Addy's broom handle and broom straw is part of the story and she is telling the book like it is a handle. Auntie Louis and Uncle Solomon would have been happy telling this story if they had been alive.
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Agatha's Feather Bed
Author: Carmen Agra Deedy
Illustrator:
Quiltmaker: Laura Seeley Martha Myers
Agatha is disrupted by six cranky, cold, naked geese who want to discuss the source of the feathers that are keeping her warm in her brand new feather bed. They want their feathers back that are inside Agatha's brand new feather bed that are keeping her so warm. Agatha had worked hard to earn that bed, and wasn't willing to give it up. Instead, Agatha tells the geese to come back to her in three days. She closed her shop to the public and starting working. On the third night the geese showed up just as they had agreed, and as they came into Agatha's bedroom they saw six white, fleecy coats. They were so surprised and thankful. They then looked at Agatha and saw what their coats were made of, Agatha's hair. They all giggled and on their way out the geese reminded Agatha, ƒ??lucky for you and me, hair grows backƒ??just like feathers.ƒ? Agatha arrives at a solution and finally understands that:

""Everything comes from something,
Nothing comes from nothing.
Just like paper comes from trees,
And glass comes from sand,
An answer comes from a question.
All you have to do is ask.

Ecology
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Grandmother Winter
Author: Phyllis Root
Illustrator: Beth Krommes
Quiltmaker: Pat Froelich
Grandmother Winter is actually an all around flock of geese. Grandmother herds her geese as they gobble and squawk. All through the summer, Grandmother gathers the feathers. Come autumn, Grandmother sews on her quilt stitch by stitch. When the days burn down toward the longest night, she shakes her feathers around the room. Grandmother shakes cardinals and chickadees fluff themselves up against the cold. Brown bats hang head-down, pickerel frogs, and minnows slowly swim. Bull snakes coil in woodchuck dens. Children pull off boots and coats. Wind the pine sings shush, shush. Grandmother Winter sleeps down the feathers.
Season
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Mrs. Noah's Patchwork Quilt
Author: Janet Bolton
Illustrtor: Janet Bolton
Quiltmaker: Kathy Bridges
This is a simple story of how Mrs. Noah decided to make a quilt during the 40 days and nights on the ark during the great flood.
Animal on the Ark
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No Dragons on My Quilt
Going to bed

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Old Dame Counterpane
Author: Jane Yolen
Illustrator: Ruth Tietjen Councell
Quiltmaker: Rita Shields
Old Dame Counterpane makes a rhyming counting quilt. On day 1, Old Dame Counterpane has just begun and picks a thread as yellow as the sun. On day 2, Old Dame Counterpane, she has deep and blue and white of clouds. On day 3 picks a thread blue-green which makes her think it is time for tea. Old Dame Counterpane has 4 days and she can do it with woodsy greens and poppy reds. For square number 5, she picks black threads to make bees in their hives. She squares number 6, gets dogs and cats, fuzzy brown bats, etc. On day number 7, she sews in the birds of every color. On day number 8, into the sea she sews fish of every color. Old Dame Counterpane sews square number 9 with grays and browns and stitches the outline of a town. In square number 10 she sews in women and then men.
Counting, rhyming
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Patchwork Island
Author: Karla Kuskin
Illustrator: Petra Mathers
Quiltmaker: Ginette Collins
"This place began with yellow, blues, red, and needles, scissors, and thread. The green for leaves and fields, blue water, and the red that shades to brown. For roads that wander down green valleys. Come see what I have made. A patchwork island cut and sewed for you. At night, we'll use it as a quilt to cover you. "
Poem, island home
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Patchwork Tales
Author: Susan Roth
Illustrator: Ruth Phang
Quiltmaker: Kathy Lawton
Quiltmaker: Betsy Malone
When the granddaughter asks for a quilt of her own, Grandma suggests they make one together. Brief directions for a doll's quilt follow.
Stories, families
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Quilt of Dreams
Author: Mindy Dwyer
Illustrator: Mindy Dwyer
Quiltmaker: Jody L. Buhay
After her grandmother's death, Katy and her mother find a stack of quilt patches and a note that reads "Kate's quilt.ƒ? As the first snow falls, Katy resumes her goal to finish the quilt Gram had started for her before she died, including her grandmother's favorite birds. Katy enlists the aid of her mother, who promises to give her Gram's special scissors when she has mastered her stitches. As Katy struggles with her needle and thread, she and her mother wonder about the significance of the pattern, which is revealed through Katy's dream of migrating cranes. The girl then recognizes the repeating pattern of triangles as cranes, special to Katy from her early childhood dreams, harbingers of spring for the far north and, for Gram (whose scissors are shaped like a crane), a symbol of tradition.
Grandmothers, families
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Reuben & the Quilt
Author: Good, Merle
Illustrator: P. Buclkey Moss
Quiltmaker: Suzanne Hall
Quiltmaker: Jeannie Lewis
In many cultures, quilting is a way of life... the Amish and Mennonite cultures are two of those and, I have always had an interest in their cultures.

Reuben, a young Amish boy, joins his older sisters in making a quilt for an elderly gentleman in the community who was injured when his buggy was hit by a car from behind. While he quilts, readers learn how quilting brings together the Amish community to show their support for one another, as the quilt that's being sewn is going to be up for auction - what a show of support! The great thing about this book is that it brings in another very important aspect of the Amish faith - not seeking revenge when someone wrongs you. Once the family has completed sewing the quilt, it gets hung outside to observe as the family completes their ""chores."" Somehow, the quilt is stolen, but rather than being bitter and seeking revenge, the family takes on an entirely different attitude, believing that the thief is poor and the quilt is badly needed. Luckily, all turns out well...
Amish, raising money
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Ruby
Author: Alison Lester
Illustrator: Alison Lester
Quiltmaker: Lene Neesbye-Hansen
Ruby has owned Betsy, her own special quilt, since she was a baby. Ruby's patchwork quilt is more than a source of security and warmth and one night Ruby rescues it from the clothes line where her mother had washed it and hung it up to dry. She sneaks out the window and discovers that it flies, just like a magic carpet. They rise together above trees and houses, and soar beyond the city lights and over the vast sea. An island appears, and here they are greeted by a tearful lion king and queen who tell them that a wicked serpent has kidnapped their beloved triplets. Ruby the brave saves them and wins the gratitude and hospitality of the island dwellers.
Nightmares, adventures
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Sam Johnson & the Blue Ribbon Quilt
Author: Lisa Campbell Ernst
Illustrator: Lisa Campbell Ernst
Quiltmaker: Ben Hollingsworth
Sam Johnson sat early one day and decided to fix his pig pen's tarp. He decided that he like the fixing and then he decided to tell his wife. When his wife came home he liked the fixing and that he had decided to join his wife's club! Now Sam, she just laughed at him, you don't really want to know. Mrs. Johnson and Sam cleared his throat, I've come to join your club. A small snicker was heard around the room. We can't have a man here bungling everything. Sam stalked out of the room. Sam Johnson went around with posters and that evening was a rousing one. Men, we have a serious problem, and now we can do something about it. Sam and all the other men sat around working on their quilt. Meanwhile, the women were hard at work on their block when one club president said I wonder what their colors their working on. The women gently folded their quilt and the men gently folded their quilt. The wagons passed through the fairground grates and then a landed in a gutter. Wait, Sam cried all that morning and all that night and then they pieced them together. Sam, replied Flying Sailboats!
Problem solving
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Texas Star
Author: Barbara Hancock Cole
Illustrator: Barbara Minton
Quiltmaker: Colleen Regan
"When the dew in the meadow turns to frost and fall is in the air, Mama knows it's almost quilt-making time. There's plenty to do first, though: a whole get-ready-for-winter list to work through, the front room to clean and polish and empty for the quilters' frame, and mountains of pies, cakes, shortbread, and fried chicken to make. ""We don't need another quilt,"" Papa grumbles. ""It's too much trouble."" But finally--and with Papa's help--everything is ready, and Mama's friends arrive to make this year's beauty, a Texas Star. The little girls of the family watch expectantly as all day the quilters work, stitching and stitching. And just in time for the first snow, the Texas Star is finished, ready for winter.

"
Families
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That Summer
Author: Tony Johnson
Illustrator: Barry Moser
Quiltmaker: Julie Stephens
This is the tale of two brothers, one terminally ill. The boys revel in the freedom that summer brings until the younger falls ill and quickly grows worse. Joey is leaving, says the older brother, who narrates. As the boys struggle to come to terms with their grief, their grandmother teaches Joey how to quilt. He pieces together scenes of all the things he has cherished, from his dog, Spoon, to lightning bugs, baseball and country roads. In the end, it's up to his older brother to fit in the last piece as Joey's bereaved family and friends come together
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The Bone Talker
Author: Shelley Leedahl
Illustrator: Bill Slavin
Quiltmaker: Barbara Means
The Bone Talker is a story about an old woman who talked to her bones. She doesn't venture outside and mostly just listens to her bones. A neighbor on the west and the east decide to pull up the bone talker as the old man can not do it alone. So the neighbors and their families set out to make the woman happy but failed. The old man tried to get his wife to speak to him but wasn't able to. A tiny child climbed his way through the forest of legs to give the woman two pieces of fabric. Neighbors and friends ran to houses to get more fabric for the woman to sew. No one knows when her work stopped but if you fly over the prairie sky where she lived you can see the old woman's work.
Helping a family mother
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The Boy & the Quilt
Author: Shirley Kurtz
Illustrator: Cheryl Benner
Quiltmaker: Rena Wilkins
Families
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The Keeping Quilt
Author: Patricia Polacco
Illustrator: Patricia Polacco
Quiltmaker: Jennifer Greer
When Patricia's Great-Gramma Anna came to America as a child from Russia, the only things she brought along with her were her dress and the babushka she liked to throw up into the air when she was dancing. Anna outgrew the dress and her mother decided to incorporate it and the babushka into a quilt. Anna's mother used items from other family members to create a quilt that would be passed down from generation to generation. This quilt was used as a Sabbath tablecloth, a wedding canopy, and as a blanket to welcome each new child into the world. This quilt ties together the lives of our generations of an immigrant Jewish family and remains a symbol of their enduring faith and love.
Immigrant, wedding
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The Moon Quilt
Author: Sunny Warner
Illustrator: Sunny Warner
Quiltmaker: Millie Burgos Vega
Warner's illustrations are the most compelling feature of this story about an old woman who integrates her memories, dreams, and current life into the quilt she is making. The unnamed protagonist dreams, ""of her old man, who was lost at sea,"" and stitches the dream into her quilt. She plants pumpkins and flowers and they become part of her design. Children come for pumpkin pie at Halloween and they are included in her work. After she stitches in pieces representing herself and her cat, the quilt is done. She and her cat sleep and dream of returning to youth and sailing off into the moonlight. Moons
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The Much Too Loved Quilt
Author: Rachel Waterstone
Illustrator: Marnie Webster
Quiltmaker: Meg Latimer
The kids in Room 213 became quiet while Miss Lane drew one name from the bag for one student to take the quilt home for the weekend. Amanda took the quilt home and thought about the kids in room 213 and how bad they acted. Each child takes the quilt home and something happens to it.
Class quilt
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The Name Quilt
Author: Phyllis Root
Illustrator: Margot Apple
Quiltmaker: Margaret Osmulski
Summer evenings at Grandma's house always end just the way Sadie likes ƒ?? with Grandma tucking her in with the name quilt. As Sadie chooses from among the patchwork of hand-stitched names of generations of relatives, Grandma tells story after story ƒ?? stories of hog-riding and hornets and Grandma's own wedding. Then one summer day, a fierce storm comes on too quickly to get the washing off the line, and the quilt is blown away. That night, Sadie worries that more than just the quilt has disappeared, until Grandma shows her that all her favorite names and stories are more a part of Sadie than she knows. Phyllis Root's loving tribute to a bedtime ritual from her own childhood and Margot Apple's intricate illustrations bring the story of Sadie and the name quilt to the page with just the right touch of humor and heart.Families
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The Pokey Little Puppy
Author: Jen Chandler
Illustrator: Jean Chandler
Quiltmaker:
Misbehaving puppies
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The Quiltmaker's Gift
Author: Jeff Brumbeau
Illustrator: Gail de Marcken
Quiltmaker: Diana Gange
Once upon a time, there was a quiltmaker who made quilts for the poor. People came from far and wide with money to buy one of her quilts but she refused to sell them to the rich. At night she would wander down to the town and find a person in need of a quilt and she would wrap them up in a quilt. At this time, there was a powerful and greedy king who liked nothing better than to receive gifts and he heard about the quiltmaker and wanted to have her give him a gift of a quilt. When he sent his men to take it from her, she through it out the window and a great gust of wind carried it away. The king had his men shackle her to a leg iron and tie her to the bear's cave. Next, when he went out to get her and found her having tea and blueberries, he became so furious that he had his men build her a small island so she could drown there. A small bird landed on her shoulder and she made him a cloak so he could stay warm. He proceeded to get more birds and came back and carried her to shore. So the king finally agreed to give away some of his treasures and the people receiving them were so thrilled that he was actually quite happy. Next he saw how happy the townspeople were so he ordered all his gifts be brought out and the quiltmaker began sewing him a quilt. It was such a beautiful quilt that the King was surprised and happy to receive it.Helping others
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The Quiltmaker's Journey
Author: Jeff Brumbeau
Illustrator: Gail DeMarcken
Quiltmaker: Pat Sikes
This sumptuously illustrated prequel to the beloved ""The Quiltmaker's Gift"" tells the story behind the quiltmaker's spirit of generosity and giving. Escaping from the protective walls of wealth and privilege, a young girl discovers the harsh world outside, where some people don't have as much as others. When she realizes that she has the power to help them, the young girl finds a strength and peace she never knew before. Making the loveliest quilts in all the land, the young girl decides to give them away.

Once there was a girl who lived in a town which was surrounded by a high wall. Within the wall the people lived happily, they had all the good things that made life comfortable, they did not experience any hardship. In the town there was a girl who was immensely rich, who wore gorgeous clothes and who had a party in her lavish home every night. And yet, even though she had everything she wanted, the girl was not happy. She could not help feeling that something was missing from her life and that there was something that she should be doing which was worthwhile and important. Then came the day when the girl decided to see what lay beyond the wall that surrounded her town. As a child she had been told that terrible things lay in the world outside and yet the girl still wanted to know what really lay beyond the high wall. So, she went through a tunnel which went under the wall and what she found beyond the wall horrified her. For the first time the girl saw poverty, she saw people who did not have enough to eat and who lived in houses that were ramshackle and old. The girl saw misery, suffering and unhappiness. And yet, in this world so full of pain, the girl discovered that when she did have something to give, it felt wonderful to share what little she had with others. The girl went back to the town where she grew up and tried to convince the town elders that they should all help the poor people who lived outside the wall but they were unsympathetic and would not listen to what she had to say. The girl had to choose between her old life and the world outside and she chose the latter, accepting a life of poverty. In time the girl discovers what she can give to those in need and she begins a life full of the joy of giving and sharing.
Helping others
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The Tamale Quilt
Author: Jane Tenorio-Coscarelli
llustrator: Jane Tenorio-Coscarelli
Quiltmaker: Suzanne Hall
Rosa was sick and lying on the couch, when her grandmother arrived with her suitcase. Nana brought her Tamale Quilt and began telling the two children the story of her quilt. When she was a little girl, she would sit across the table and help herself to the olives. Her mother would crush the dry corn and mix it with lard. Next her father would come in and help knead the masa. The children would help put the masa in the middle and top it with olives. Her mother would cook the tamales in the big kettle and pack a dozen tamales to take to church. Nana began telling the story of how the Tamale Quilt came about, the colors, the smells, etc. Nana eventually left the Tamale Quilt for Rosa so that she can share the stories.
Families
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