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Book Cover & QuiltGrade TitleAuthor/IllustratorSynopsisTopicsLesson Plan

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K-2ndA Name on the QuiltAuthor: Jeannine Atkins
Illustrator: Tad Hills
Quiltmaker: Laurie Stoner
Atkins offers a simple way to discuss the issues concerning AIDS, death, and homosexuality through the story of one family's efforts to make a section for the AIDS Memorial Quilt project. The story is told by Lauren, a young girl whose Uncle Ron passed away. Her parents, younger brother, grandmother, and Ron's roommate and friends gather to work on a quilt panel. Using scraps of clothing and fabric with colors and pattern that remind them of Uncle Ron, the family is grieving and doing something positive to remember and celebrate the life of a loved one.AIDS Memoria
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K-2ndAddy's Wedding Quilt
Author: Connie Porter & Dahl Taylor
Illustrator: Susan McAliley
Quiltmaker: Margaret Osmulski
Addy's been sewing for weeks and she was going to put some new applique's in the quilt. Miss Dunn, her new teacher, would be teaching her some new embroidery skills. Addy knew that she couldn't tell the thread with color from the knowledge of the quilt, but an army of elephants couldn't have done a better job than Addy did. Addy called out a letter of the alphabet and her judgments when Harriet called out to her knowledge. To turn her book Harriet, she jumped past her self satisfied smirk. Addy's folks got married on the plantation and now they are getting married again. Addy's question was to simply ask who spoke about getting married in the church. Momma and Poppa want to get married in the church, so they can stay together. Where was she telling Poppa's broom handle from the old cuff and the broom straw from the hem of a dress? Addy's broom handle and broom straw is part of the story and she is telling the book like it is a handle. Auntie Louis and Uncle Solomon would have been happy telling this story if they had been alive.
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K-2ndAgatha's Feather Bed
Author: Carmen Agra Deedy
Illustrator:
Quiltmaker: Laura Seeley Martha Myers
Agatha is disrupted by six cranky, cold, naked geese who want to discuss the source of the feathers that are keeping her warm in her brand new feather bed. They want their feathers back that are inside Agatha's brand new feather bed that are keeping her so warm. Agatha had worked hard to earn that bed, and wasn't willing to give it up. Instead, Agatha tells the geese to come back to her in three days. She closed her shop to the public and starting working. On the third night the geese showed up just as they had agreed, and as they came into Agatha's bedroom they saw six white, fleecy coats. They were so surprised and thankful. They then looked at Agatha and saw what their coats were made of, Agatha's hair. They all giggled and on their way out the geese reminded Agatha, ƒ??lucky for you and me, hair grows backƒ??just like feathers.ƒ? Agatha arrives at a solution and finally understands that:

""Everything comes from something,
Nothing comes from nothing.
Just like paper comes from trees,
And glass comes from sand,
An answer comes from a question.
All you have to do is ask.

Ecology
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K-2ndBefore I was BornAuthor: Harriet Ziefert
Illustrator: Rufus Coes
Quiltmaker: Kathy L. Lawton

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K-2ndErnest and Celestine's Patchwork Quilt
Author: Gabrielle Vincent
Illustrator: Gabrielle Vincent
Quiltmaker: Carol Koslowsky
This book has no words. The story is told by the illustrations. Ernest and Celestine make a quilt but soon realize they need to make two quilts, one for each of them.
Cooperation and problem solving

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K-2ndGrandmother Winter
Author: Phyllis Root
Illustrator: Beth Krommes
Quiltmaker: Pat Froelich
Grandmother Winter is actually an all around flock of geese. Grandmother herds her geese as they gobble and squawk. All through the summer, Grandmother gathers the feathers. Come autumn, Grandmother sews on her quilt stitch by stitch. When the days burn down toward the longest night, she shakes her feathers around the room. Grandmother shakes cardinals and chickadees fluff themselves up against the cold. Brown bats hang head-down, pickerel frogs, and minnows slowly swim. Bull snakes coil in woodchuck dens. Children pull off boots and coats. Wind the pine sings shush, shush. Grandmother Winter sleeps down the feathers.
Season
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K-2ndJust a Quilt?Author: Dalen Keys
Illustrator: Kim Sponaugle
Quiltmaker: Doris T. Evans
Chase is getting ready to visit grandma. His mom asks if he packed his quilt. Chase’s answer was that he does not have a quilt but rather a series of possessions based on the uses he has for his quilt.
Family and love

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K-2ndLuka's Quilt
Author: Georgia Guback
Illustrator: Georgia Guback
Quiltmaker: Fran Fister
Tutu (grandmother) is going to make a traditional Hawaiian flower garden quilt for Luka’s bed. Luka is only allowed to pick one color and wants to have many colors like the flowers in the garden. Luka is very disappointed with her Hawaiian Quilt and Tutu finds the answer in a lei that is placed on top of the quilt.
Vocabulary:
1. Tutu – Hawaiian for grandmother
2. Patient – bearing or enduring pain or hardship by being calm
3. Sketch – a hurried drawing that is not meant to be final (a draft of a drawing)
4. Amaryllis – a flower, usually found during the holiday season
5. Ginger – a herb that is used in medicine or spice
6. Jacaranda – a tropical plant that has long lasting blue/purple flowers
7. Truce – Put aside differences and come together again for a while; a resolution
8. Bento – a meal consisting of rice, fish or meat, and vegetables, a fast food
9. Lei – a garland or wreath of anything but most commonly used with flowers
10. Tatami mat – a mat made of rice straw
Family and love

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K-2ndMrs. Noah's Patchwork Quilt
Author: Janet Bolton
Illustrtor: Janet Bolton
Quiltmaker: Kathy Bridges
This is a simple story of how Mrs. Noah decided to make a quilt during the 40 days and nights on the ark during the great flood.
Animal on the Ark
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K-2ndNo Dragons on My Quilt
Going to bed

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K-2ndOld Dame Counterpane
Author: Jane Yolen
Illustrator: Ruth Tietjen Councell
Quiltmaker: Rita Shields
Old Dame Counterpane makes a rhyming counting quilt. On day 1, Old Dame Counterpane has just begun and picks a thread as yellow as the sun. On day 2, Old Dame Counterpane, she has deep and blue and white of clouds. On day 3 picks a thread blue-green which makes her think it is time for tea. Old Dame Counterpane has 4 days and she can do it with woodsy greens and poppy reds. For square number 5, she picks black threads to make bees in their hives. She squares number 6, gets dogs and cats, fuzzy brown bats, etc. On day number 7, she sews in the birds of every color. On day number 8, into the sea she sews fish of every color. Old Dame Counterpane sews square number 9 with grays and browns and stitches the outline of a town. In square number 10 she sews in women and then men.
Counting, rhyming
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K-2ndPatchwork Island
Author: Karla Kuskin
Illustrator: Petra Mathers
Quiltmaker: Ginette Collins
"This place began with yellow, blues, red, and needles, scissors, and thread. The green for leaves and fields, blue water, and the red that shades to brown. For roads that wander down green valleys. Come see what I have made. A patchwork island cut and sewed for you. At night, we'll use it as a quilt to cover you. "
Poem, island home
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K-2ndPatchwork Tales
Author: Susan Roth
Illustrator: Ruth Phang
Quiltmaker: Kathy Lawton
Quiltmaker: Betsy Malone
When the granddaughter asks for a quilt of her own, Grandma suggests they make one together. Brief directions for a doll's quilt follow.
Stories, families
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K-2ndQuilt AlphabetAuthor: Lesa Cline-Ransome
Illustrator: James E. Ransome
Quiltmaker: Wendy Blumeyer

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K-2ndQuilt of Dreams
Author: Mindy Dwyer
Illustrator: Mindy Dwyer
Quiltmaker: Jody L. Buhay
After her grandmother's death, Katy and her mother find a stack of quilt patches and a note that reads "Kate's quilt.ƒ? As the first snow falls, Katy resumes her goal to finish the quilt Gram had started for her before she died, including her grandmother's favorite birds. Katy enlists the aid of her mother, who promises to give her Gram's special scissors when she has mastered her stitches. As Katy struggles with her needle and thread, she and her mother wonder about the significance of the pattern, which is revealed through Katy's dream of migrating cranes. The girl then recognizes the repeating pattern of triangles as cranes, special to Katy from her early childhood dreams, harbingers of spring for the far north and, for Gram (whose scissors are shaped like a crane), a symbol of tradition.
Grandmothers, families
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K-2ndReuben & the Quilt
Author: Good, Merle
Illustrator: P. Buclkey Moss
Quiltmaker: Suzanne Hall
Quiltmaker: Jeannie Lewis
In many cultures, quilting is a way of life... the Amish and Mennonite cultures are two of those and, I have always had an interest in their cultures.

Reuben, a young Amish boy, joins his older sisters in making a quilt for an elderly gentleman in the community who was injured when his buggy was hit by a car from behind. While he quilts, readers learn how quilting brings together the Amish community to show their support for one another, as the quilt that's being sewn is going to be up for auction - what a show of support! The great thing about this book is that it brings in another very important aspect of the Amish faith - not seeking revenge when someone wrongs you. Once the family has completed sewing the quilt, it gets hung outside to observe as the family completes their ""chores."" Somehow, the quilt is stolen, but rather than being bitter and seeking revenge, the family takes on an entirely different attitude, believing that the thief is poor and the quilt is badly needed. Luckily, all turns out well...
Amish, raising money
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K-2ndRuby
Author: Alison Lester
Illustrator: Alison Lester
Quiltmaker: Lene Neesbye-Hansen
Ruby has owned Betsy, her own special quilt, since she was a baby. Ruby's patchwork quilt is more than a source of security and warmth and one night Ruby rescues it from the clothes line where her mother had washed it and hung it up to dry. She sneaks out the window and discovers that it flies, just like a magic carpet. They rise together above trees and houses, and soar beyond the city lights and over the vast sea. An island appears, and here they are greeted by a tearful lion king and queen who tell them that a wicked serpent has kidnapped their beloved triplets. Ruby the brave saves them and wins the gratitude and hospitality of the island dwellers.
Nightmares, adventures
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K-2ndSam Johnson & the Blue Ribbon Quilt
Author: Lisa Campbell Ernst
Illustrator: Lisa Campbell Ernst
Quiltmaker: Ben Hollingsworth
Sam Johnson sat early one day and decided to fix his pig pen's tarp. He decided that he like the fixing and then he decided to tell his wife. When his wife came home he liked the fixing and that he had decided to join his wife's club! Now Sam, she just laughed at him, you don't really want to know. Mrs. Johnson and Sam cleared his throat, I've come to join your club. A small snicker was heard around the room. We can't have a man here bungling everything. Sam stalked out of the room. Sam Johnson went around with posters and that evening was a rousing one. Men, we have a serious problem, and now we can do something about it. Sam and all the other men sat around working on their quilt. Meanwhile, the women were hard at work on their block when one club president said I wonder what their colors their working on. The women gently folded their quilt and the men gently folded their quilt. The wagons passed through the fairground grates and then a landed in a gutter. Wait, Sam cried all that morning and all that night and then they pieced them together. Sam, replied Flying Sailboats!
Problem solving
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K-2ndSharing Grandma's Gift
Author: Shelley Berlin Parrish
Illustrator: Kristi Petosa-Sigel
Quiltmaker: Linda J Carriero

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K-2ndStar Blanket
Author: Pat Brisson
Illustrator: Erica Magnus
Quiltmaker: Diana Gange
"When Laura goes to bed at night, she loves to hear her Dad tell the story of her special Star Blanket. The story begins with her father, Tommy, as a little boy, on the day of his baby sister Patty’s baptism. Afterwards, when presents were being opened for baby Patty, Tommy realized there weren’t any for him. But Gram handed him a special package wrapped in tissue--the Star Blanket. Gram told him that each white star represented a family member, and she helped him to memorize each one. By Christmas, Tommy was able to memorize all forty-one names. As a grown-up, Laura’s dad teaches her to say good night to all the relatives on the Star Blanket along with him.
The book teaches the readers what it means to be part of a big, warm, extended family and the comfort of family stories wrapped up in a beautiful blanket.
"
Family and love-relationships, storytelling, relatives; counting; quilts; non-fiction

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K-2ndTexas Star
Author: Barbara Hancock Cole
Illustrator: Barbara Minton
Quiltmaker: Colleen Regan
"When the dew in the meadow turns to frost and fall is in the air, Mama knows it's almost quilt-making time. There's plenty to do first, though: a whole get-ready-for-winter list to work through, the front room to clean and polish and empty for the quilters' frame, and mountains of pies, cakes, shortbread, and fried chicken to make. ""We don't need another quilt,"" Papa grumbles. ""It's too much trouble."" But finally--and with Papa's help--everything is ready, and Mama's friends arrive to make this year's beauty, a Texas Star. The little girls of the family watch expectantly as all day the quilters work, stitching and stitching. And just in time for the first snow, the Texas Star is finished, ready for winter.

"
Families
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K-2ndThat Summer
Author: Tony Johnson
Illustrator: Barry Moser
Quiltmaker: Julie Stephens
This is the tale of two brothers, one terminally ill. The boys revel in the freedom that summer brings until the younger falls ill and quickly grows worse. Joey is leaving, says the older brother, who narrates. As the boys struggle to come to terms with their grief, their grandmother teaches Joey how to quilt. He pieces together scenes of all the things he has cherished, from his dog, Spoon, to lightning bugs, baseball and country roads. In the end, it's up to his older brother to fit in the last piece as Joey's bereaved family and friends come together
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K-2ndThe Berenstein Bears and Mama's New Job
Author: Stan and Jan Berenstain
Illustrator: Stan and Jan Berenstain
Quiltmaker: Heather Mendez
"Papa Bear decides to sell some of his furniture in the yard and Mama Bear hangs her quilt to air. Customers have a lot of interest in Mama Bear’s quilts and she opens a quilt shop against protests from her family. Mama Bear’s business is a success and the Bear family is proud of her, especially the extra money.

"
Cooperation and problem solving

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K-2ndThe Bone Talker
Author: Shelley Leedahl
Illustrator: Bill Slavin
Quiltmaker: Barbara Means
The Bone Talker is a story about an old woman who talked to her bones. She doesn't venture outside and mostly just listens to her bones. A neighbor on the west and the east decide to pull up the bone talker as the old man can not do it alone. So the neighbors and their families set out to make the woman happy but failed. The old man tried to get his wife to speak to him but wasn't able to. A tiny child climbed his way through the forest of legs to give the woman two pieces of fabric. Neighbors and friends ran to houses to get more fabric for the woman to sew. No one knows when her work stopped but if you fly over the prairie sky where she lived you can see the old woman's work.
Helping a family mother
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K-2ndThe Boy & the Quilt
Author: Shirley Kurtz
Illustrator: Cheryl Benner
Quiltmaker: Rena Wilkins
Families
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K-2ndThe Christmas Memory Quilt
Author: Kimberly Webb
Illustrator: Jennifer Gaskin
Quiltmaker: Shelly L. Jones
"Brynne gets a birthday present of fabric from her Grandma. Together they will each sew a quilt by Christmas to be given to the orphanage. During the quilt process, Grandma relates Christmas memories. In the end, Brynne gets her own Christmas surprise – the quilt she made is for her new brother from Romania.

"
Family and love

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K-2ndThe Keeping Quilt
Author: Patricia Polacco
Illustrator: Patricia Polacco
Quiltmaker: Jennifer Greer
When Patricia's Great-Gramma Anna came to America as a child from Russia, the only things she brought along with her were her dress and the babushka she liked to throw up into the air when she was dancing. Anna outgrew the dress and her mother decided to incorporate it and the babushka into a quilt. Anna's mother used items from other family members to create a quilt that would be passed down from generation to generation. This quilt was used as a Sabbath tablecloth, a wedding canopy, and as a blanket to welcome each new child into the world. This quilt ties together the lives of our generations of an immigrant Jewish family and remains a symbol of their enduring faith and love.
Immigrant, wedding
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K-2ndThe Flying Patchwork Quilt
Author: Barbara Brenner
Illustrator: Fred Brenner
Quiltmaker: Suzanne Hall
Mother likes to buy old stuff. She brings home a pine chest with an old patchwork quilt in the bottom of it. It is a beautiful quilt and gets put away until spring. That’s when Mother goes to the store and leaves brother, Carl, to keep an eye on his sister Ellen. Ellen has been trying to fly and digs out the old quilt. One minute she’s jumping off the doghouse roof and then… FLYING! Brother gets his bike and races to find her. He finally goes home to tell his mother of his sister’s disappearance. Sister Ellen is sitting in the apple tree in their yard with the quilt caught on the branches. Carl gets her untangled and hurries to put the quilt away … and then has another thought … maybe he could fly. He waits until night time but before he can get the quilt pinned on, the breeze takes it away…Vanished.
Cooperation and problem solving

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K-2ndThe Moon Quilt
Author: Sunny Warner
Illustrator: Sunny Warner
Quiltmaker: Millie Burgos Vega
Warner's illustrations are the most compelling feature of this story about an old woman who integrates her memories, dreams, and current life into the quilt she is making. The unnamed protagonist dreams, ""of her old man, who was lost at sea,"" and stitches the dream into her quilt. She plants pumpkins and flowers and they become part of her design. Children come for pumpkin pie at Halloween and they are included in her work. After she stitches in pieces representing herself and her cat, the quilt is done. She and her cat sleep and dream of returning to youth and sailing off into the moonlight. Moons
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K-2ndThe Much Too Loved Quilt
Author: Rachel Waterstone
Illustrator: Marnie Webster
Quiltmaker: Meg Latimer
The kids in Room 213 became quiet while Miss Lane drew one name from the bag for one student to take the quilt home for the weekend. Amanda took the quilt home and thought about the kids in room 213 and how bad they acted. Each child takes the quilt home and something happens to it.
Class quilt
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K-2ndThe Name Quilt
Author: Phyllis Root
Illustrator: Margot Apple
Quiltmaker: Margaret Osmulski
Summer evenings at Grandma's house always end just the way Sadie likes ƒ?? with Grandma tucking her in with the name quilt. As Sadie chooses from among the patchwork of hand-stitched names of generations of relatives, Grandma tells story after story ƒ?? stories of hog-riding and hornets and Grandma's own wedding. Then one summer day, a fierce storm comes on too quickly to get the washing off the line, and the quilt is blown away. That night, Sadie worries that more than just the quilt has disappeared, until Grandma shows her that all her favorite names and stories are more a part of Sadie than she knows. Phyllis Root's loving tribute to a bedtime ritual from her own childhood and Margot Apple's intricate illustrations bring the story of Sadie and the name quilt to the page with just the right touch of humor and heart.Families
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K-2ndThe Patchwork FarmerAuthor: Craig Brown
Illustrator: Craig Brown
Quiltmaker: Ben Hollingsworth
book contains no words. The illustrations tell the story. The farmer rips his pants and sews them so many times, that his pants begin to look like the fields of the farm.
Problem solving

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K-2ndThe Patchwork QuiltAuthor: Valerie Flournoy
Illustrator: Jerry Pinkney
Quiltmaker: Elizabeth Veronneau

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K-2ndThe Piñata Quilt
Author: Jane Tenorio-Coscarelli
Illustrator: Jane Tenorio-Coscarelli
Quiltmaker: Janie E. Stokes
"Every year for Albert’s birthday, Tia Lilly makes him a piñata. One year, Albert decides to add extra glue and the piñata is too hard to break. When he is too old for a birthday piñata, she makes him a quilt of his favorite piñata.

"
Family and love

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K-2ndThe Pokey Little Puppy
Author: Jen Chandler
Illustrator: Jean Chandler
Quiltmaker:
Misbehaving puppies
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K-2ndThe Promise Quilt

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K-2ndThe Quilt
Author: Ann Jonas
Illustrator: Ann Jonas
Quiltmaker: Lin Christiansen
A new patchwork quilt is finished for a young girl moving up to a new grown-up bed. Her parents have made it from a patchwork of fabrics the child remembers: her first curtains and crib sheet, her baby pajamas, birthday shirt, outgrown favorite pants, and even fabric used to make her stuffed dog, Sally. She wonders how she can possibly sleep when there is so much to look at, to remember, and to dream about. Recalling old memories provides new adventures at bedtime, and in her dreams.
Family and love, bedtime, quilts, family memories
The QuiltGary P

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K-2ndThe Quilt StoryAuthor: Tony Johnson
Illustrator: Tomie dePaola
Quiltmaker: Helen D. Best

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K-2ndThe Quiltmaker's Gift
Author: Jeff Brumbeau
Illustrator: Gail de Marcken
Quiltmaker: Diana Gange
Once upon a time, there was a quiltmaker who made quilts for the poor. People came from far and wide with money to buy one of her quilts but she refused to sell them to the rich. At night she would wander down to the town and find a person in need of a quilt and she would wrap them up in a quilt. At this time, there was a powerful and greedy king who liked nothing better than to receive gifts and he heard about the quiltmaker and wanted to have her give him a gift of a quilt. When he sent his men to take it from her, she through it out the window and a great gust of wind carried it away. The king had his men shackle her to a leg iron and tie her to the bear's cave. Next, when he went out to get her and found her having tea and blueberries, he became so furious that he had his men build her a small island so she could drown there. A small bird landed on her shoulder and she made him a cloak so he could stay warm. He proceeded to get more birds and came back and carried her to shore. So the king finally agreed to give away some of his treasures and the people receiving them were so thrilled that he was actually quite happy. Next he saw how happy the townspeople were so he ordered all his gifts be brought out and the quiltmaker began sewing him a quilt. It was such a beautiful quilt that the King was surprised and happy to receive it.Helping others
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K-2ndThe Quiltmaker's Journey
Author: Jeff Brumbeau
Illustrator: Gail DeMarcken
Quiltmaker: Pat Sikes
This sumptuously illustrated prequel to the beloved ""The Quiltmaker's Gift"" tells the story behind the quiltmaker's spirit of generosity and giving. Escaping from the protective walls of wealth and privilege, a young girl discovers the harsh world outside, where some people don't have as much as others. When she realizes that she has the power to help them, the young girl finds a strength and peace she never knew before. Making the loveliest quilts in all the land, the young girl decides to give them away.

Once there was a girl who lived in a town which was surrounded by a high wall. Within the wall the people lived happily, they had all the good things that made life comfortable, they did not experience any hardship. In the town there was a girl who was immensely rich, who wore gorgeous clothes and who had a party in her lavish home every night. And yet, even though she had everything she wanted, the girl was not happy. She could not help feeling that something was missing from her life and that there was something that she should be doing which was worthwhile and important. Then came the day when the girl decided to see what lay beyond the wall that surrounded her town. As a child she had been told that terrible things lay in the world outside and yet the girl still wanted to know what really lay beyond the high wall. So, she went through a tunnel which went under the wall and what she found beyond the wall horrified her. For the first time the girl saw poverty, she saw people who did not have enough to eat and who lived in houses that were ramshackle and old. The girl saw misery, suffering and unhappiness. And yet, in this world so full of pain, the girl discovered that when she did have something to give, it felt wonderful to share what little she had with others. The girl went back to the town where she grew up and tried to convince the town elders that they should all help the poor people who lived outside the wall but they were unsympathetic and would not listen to what she had to say. The girl had to choose between her old life and the world outside and she chose the latter, accepting a life of poverty. In time the girl discovers what she can give to those in need and she begins a life full of the joy of giving and sharing.
Helping others
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K-2ndThe Tamale Quilt
Author: Jane Tenorio-Coscarelli
llustrator: Jane Tenorio-Coscarelli
Quiltmaker: Suzanne Hall
Rosa was sick and lying on the couch, when her grandmother arrived with her suitcase. Nana brought her Tamale Quilt and began telling the two children the story of her quilt. When she was a little girl, she would sit across the table and help herself to the olives. Her mother would crush the dry corn and mix it with lard. Next her father would come in and help knead the masa. The children would help put the masa in the middle and top it with olives. Her mother would cook the tamales in the big kettle and pack a dozen tamales to take to church. Nana began telling the story of how the Tamale Quilt came about, the colors, the smells, etc. Nana eventually left the Tamale Quilt for Rosa so that she can share the stories.
Families
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K-2ndThrough Moon and Stars and Night Skies
Author: Ann Turner
Illustrator: James Graham Hale
Quiltmaker: Bettie Coldron
"This is an endearing story of adoption, told in a simple and moving way. As the boy sits on his front porch with his mother, he remembers how he came to his new home and recounts the story to her.
Carrying a few photos of his new parents, a red dog, his new home with the green tree out front, and his new room with the teddy bear quilt on his new bed—a little boy living in a distant country travels to meet his new family. But he must travel far to get them. He must fly for a day and a night through blue skies and cloud and stars. It is all frightening and unfamiliar to the boy. But before long, he comes to a place where the photos mesh with what he encounters, paving the way for trust and security to develop. He can call this place home with his loving, new adopted family.
"
Family and love, adoption, memories

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K-2ndTutu & the Ti Plant
Author: Sandra Goforth
Illustrator: Christine Joy Pratt
Quiltmaker: Deborah Risberg
The grandmother and the two children, who were in home, were getting the home ready to pack up because of the impending storm. Chelsea and Chad were helping their grandmother tape the windows and move furniture inside the home. When the three got to Aunty Betty’s house the wind and the storm began in earnest. Aunty Betty grabbed the closest thing to her which was a kapa moe (a Hawaiian Quilt). While under the quilt, the four of them discussed the early Hawaiians and how well they fared. Aunt Betty talked about how early Hawaiians, especially the men did all the cooking. Chelsea made fun of Chad’s cooking. Chelsea asked if they could play a game or do something besides sit under the quilt. Aunty Betty suggested they “fish” or catch fish using hukilau. Chad explained how his friend wouldn’t go into the water unless he threw a ti leaf in first. Aunty Betty explained how that was based on a mano that lived in the stream. The next morning all four of them went to Tutu’s house to survey the damage. It was actually very mild and all agreed that the ti brought them good luck.
Hawaii, plants, stories
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K-2ndWho's Under Grandma's Quilt?
Author: Rachel Waterstone
Illustrator: Virginia Esquinaldo
Quiltmaker: Beth Peck
Grandma’s quilt blew off the clothesline and landed on the ground. Then the quilt moved! A voice under the quilt asked for help. The chick wanted to lift the quilt but wasn’t strong enough. He asked piglet for help but piglet didn’t want to bother grandma’s quilt. Chick found kitten, puppy, and the goose but none of them were strong enough to lift the quilt, even if they worked together. Finally, with the help of pony, they are able to lift the quilt and find Grandma’s girl and Grandma’s boy were the ones under the quilt. But then the quilt moves again and an oinky voice asks for help.
Cooperation and problem solving

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3rd-6thA Cloak for the DreamerAuthor: Aileen Friedman
Illustrator: Kim Howard
Quiltmaker: Patty Hambrick
Ivan and Alex want to be tailors like their father, but youngest brother Misha dreams of travel. When each son must fashion a cloak for the Archduke, Ivan sews one using rectangles of fabric. Alex makes a cloak of squares and an extra cloak of triangles. But Misha's disastrous cloak of circles demonstrates the geometrical concept that shapes must have angles to fit together. Seeing that Misha's heart lies elsewhere, the tailor frees his son to travel the world. As a farewell gift, the tailor presents Misha with the fateful cloak, whose circles he has snipped into snug-fitting hexagons and then restitches.
Math, cooperation, problem solving, family

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Click on image to enlarge

3rd-6thA Gathering of Days A New England Girl's Journal, 1830-32
Author: Joan W. Blos
Illustrator:
Quiltmaker: Lynn Hemby
Family and love, history, a journal/diary
3rd-6thArctic Memories
Author: Normee Ekoomiak
Illustrator: Normee Ekoomiak
Quiltmaker: Laurie Stoner
Arctic Memories is a picture book of a now vanished way of life for the Eskimo, or Inuit people. The text is written both in English and in the native language, Inuktitut. The author-artist, Normee Ekoomiak looks back at his own Inuit childhood to document an arctic lifestyle of years ago. His spirited pictures of felt applique and embroidery depict traditional Inuit legends, animals native to North America, and even nativity scenes. His acrylic paintings and designs depict family life at home, children at play, and hunters on ice floes.
Eskimo life, family, language, beliefs, and history; Artic animals and nature

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Click on image to enlarge

3rd-6thAunt Skilly and the StrangerAuthor: Kathleen Stevens
Illustrator: Robert Andrew Parker
Quiltmaker: Pamela Watson
A suspicious stranger arrives at the remote mountain cabin of an old woman named Aunt Skilly, and her protective gray goose, Buckle. Aunt Skilly is kind to the stranger, even feeding him supper. But he asks too many questions about her life and the valuable quilts that she plans to sell the next day to the traveling peddler.
Aunt Skilly, suspecting he is up to no good, outwits him by hiding the quilts before he returns in the dead of night. Buckle comes to the rescue, snapping and hissing at him, chasing him into the night. He runs off with a sack of what he thinks are the beautiful quilts, only to find out that he has taken that sack, now full of worthless old corn husks.
Clever Aunt Skilly and brave Buckle sell the quilts the next day to the traveling peddler and ultimately triumph over the thief.
Mountain life, strangers

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Click on image to enlarge

3rd-6thGrandy's Quilt, a Gift for all Seasons
Author: Renee W. Rongen
Illustrator: Mary Maguire
Quiltmaker: Susan Waterman
Catherine inherits her Grandy's quilt and coffee can of memories. Every year around the holidays, Catherine's husband carries the box with the quilt from the attic, only to put it away again after the season. Catherine tries hard to find someone who can help her piece the quilt back together but the beloved quilt is tattered and beyond repair. Her children have ideas to take the quilt apart and make stockings, mittens, and angels by Christmas. Catherine finds a Mrs. Olsen who is very much like Grandy and willing to take on the task. Mrs. Olsen does a wonderful job and now the quilt has become gifts for many. Catherine writes a poem to keep Grandy's memories alive and close to their heart.
Family and love

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3rd-6thMartha Anna's Quilt for Queen Victoria
Author: Kyra E. Hicks
Illustrator: Lee Edward Fodi
Quiltmaker: Patty Hambrick
Martha Ann loved the one chore the most, the dropping into the red box. Martha Ann was born about 1817 in eastern Tennessee. Nobody in American Colonization Society, the groups that help blacks starts a new life in Liberia. When Martha Ann and her family sailed to Liberia, the American Colonization Society, on which he and the boys built a house. African fever swept through town, and with it want to stay here and go to school. Martha Ann never wanted to be swept away again and get long hard hours without pay. Sion, I know how I can make Papa and Mama proud of me. I know how I can make them pay for me. Gotorah and his tribesman started shooting at the mission and she quickly grabbed for the red tin box. Martha Ann bravely loaded muskets with bullets. Next, Martha Ann cried when Sion died and she lived alone, until she met and married Henry Ricks. I will have a very fine gift for her. Martha Ann spent weeks looking for a suitable fabric. Well, many years passed and Martha Ann met with Mrs. Jane Roberts, the wife of Liberia's first president. The people rallied for Martha Ann, as she visited with her Victoria, Queen of Great Britain. Martha Ann said I don't have much but I hope that you will cherish this gift. It was the gift of the Coffee Tree quilt.
History, slavery, quilt for Queen, non-fiction
Click for PDF of Lesson

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3rd-6thOma's Quilt
Author: Paulette Bourgeois
Illustrator: Paulette Bourgeois
Quiltmaker: Kathy Brown
Emily's grandmother has to move from her house on Maple Street to a Retirement Home and nothing makes her happy there. After Emily and her mother sort through grandmother's attic and find many treasures, they decide to make a quilt. Now grandmother can wrap herself in the quilt and feel at home.Family and love, moving away and separation

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Click on image to enlarge

3rd-6thOsa's Pride
Author: Ann Grifalconi
Illustrator: Ann Grifalconi
Quiltmaker: June Campbell
Osa is 7 years old and lives on her grandmother's coffee farm in Africa. She is very vain and very proud. Grandma Tika makes a quilt with a lesson for Osa and together they decide how to finish the quilt and get a new perspective on what is important.Family and love

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Click on image to enlarge

3rd-6thPapa and the Pioneer Quilt
Author: Jean Van Leeuwen
Illustrator: Rebecca Bond
Quiltmaker: Laurie Stoner
A pioneer family moves around the country and makes a final trek from Missouri to Oregon. Along the way, Rebecca meets a girl who is going to make a quilt from old scraps. Rebecca would like to make one also and collects scraps along the way. They encounter obstacles along the way, including fast rivers, mountains, cold nights, and snow. When they get to Oregon, Mama helps her make a quilt pattern called Wandering Foot.
History

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3rd-6thShota and the Star Quilt
Author: Margaret Bateson-Hill
Illustrator: Christine Fowler
Quiltmaker: Janie E. Stokes
Best friends, Esther and Shota, live in the same apartment building. Shota's father has received a letter from the rich, bitter developer that his family and neighbors must move out of their apartment building. Shota's Grandmother (Unci) has invited the girls to visit for the annual pow-wow at Pine Ridge. The first night at Pine Ridge, Shota wakes up and ventures outside to see the stars. She finds a flat, white, diamond-shaped stone. The next day, Shota discovers that her stone has the same shape as Unci's star quilt and the quilt on her bed. Unci and her friends help Esther and Shota piece a star quilt and tell stories of Lakota heritage. At home, her parents and neighbors at the apartment sign a petition. Together they win the developer's heart and save their community with the help of the star quilt.
History, problem solving

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3rd-6thSweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt
Author: Deborah Hopkinson
Illustrator: James Ransome
Quiltmaker: Frances L. House
Clara worked as a slave in the fields. When Aunt Rachel looks after Clara, she teaches her to sew and gets her a job as seamstress in the Big House. Clara learns about the Underground Railroad and makes a secret map from scraps of fabric to help slaves go North.
Clara worked as a slave in the fields. When Aunt Rachel looks after Clara, she teaches her to sew and gets her a job as seamstress in the Big House. Clara learns about the Underground Railroad and makes a secret map from scraps of fabric to help slaves go North.
History

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Click on image to enlarge

3rd-6thThe Canada Geese Quilt
Author: Natalie Kinsey-Warnock
Illustrator: Leslie W. Bowman
Quiltmaker: Doris T. Evans
Ariel lives on a farm in Vermont with her parents and grandmother. Her grandmother is a very accomplished quilter who helps Ariel accept the news of a new baby in the family. Ariel designs the quilt that her grandmother will sew for the new baby (Ariel hates to sew). After grandmother had a stroke, it is up to Ariel to finish the quilt and cope with the family changes in a warm and loving way.
Family and love

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Click on image to enlarge

3rd-6thThe Log Cabin Quilt
Author: Ellen Howard
Illustrator: Ronald Himler
Quiltmaker: Jessica Page
After Mams's death, the family moves from Carolina to Michigan. After arriving, they must build a cabin and chink it to keep out the cold. When the chinking freezes and falls out, they must figure a way to keep warm. Granny's scrap fabrics are just the thing to push between the logs and keep the place warm. A new version of log cabin quilt.
Family and love, moving away and separation

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Click on image to enlarge

3rd-6thThe Rag Coat
Author: Lauren Mills
Illustrator: Lauren Mills
Quiltmaker: Helena Krapp
Minna comes from a very poor family growing up in Appalachia country. As a baby, her father carries her wrapped around a blanket or inside a burlap feed sack everywhere they go since they don't have money to buy her a coat. At age eight her father dies of miner's cough and she can't go to school because she has no coat. The mothers of the town get together and quilt a coat made from old scraps. Minna is thrilled with her new coat, but when she goes to school the children make fun of her rag coat. The teasing ceased when the children were made aware that Minna's rag coat was made out of their own old shirts, pajamas, blankets, etc.
Cooperation and problem solving, family

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Click on image to enlarge

3rd-6thThe Secret Stars
Author: Joseph Slate
Illustrator: Felipe Davalos
Quiltmaker: Julie Stephens
New Mexico. Christmas time. It is a rainy, icy "Night of the Three Kings", and two children, Sila and Pepe, worry that the Kings will not be able to see and use the stars to navigate to find their home and the manger where they have left the three travelers simple gifts. So their grandmother tells them not to worry. She enfolds them into the wings of her quilt and takes them into dreamland on a magical journey. They fly up the chimney and into the night sky to find secret stars all around them, in the landscape and in their home, which will lead the Kings to their home. Finally, as dawn breaks on the day of the Three Kings, Sila and Pepe awake to unexpected surprises.
Epiphany, grandmothers, Hispanic culture, New Mexico, nature, the stars

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Click on image to enlarge

3rd-6thThe Secret to Freedom
Author: Marcia Vaughan
Illustrator: Larry Johnson
Quiltmaker: Diane Berdis
A slave family is torn apart and a brother and sister learn how quilts can lead to freedom.

Vocabulary:
1. Curtains Billowed & swelled; the curtains were full of air (from a breeze)
2. Shelling Peas - to take the peas out of the shell
3. Overseer – Supervisor; one who looks over things
4. Plantation - an agricultural estate with workers (usually who live there)
5. Underground Railroad - A network of people that helped slaves reach freedom in the north for 30 years before the Civil War by using secret methods and codes.
6. Sharecropper - a person that works the land for someone else and receives a share of the crop.
History

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3rd-6thThe Tale of Alice's Quilt
Author: Jennifer Blomgren
Illustrator: Jennifer Blomgren
Quiltmaker: Sandra Ryan
A young girl named Alice discovers a stack of applique quilt blocks from the past. This thread to another time and place opens her exploration of family history. Her desire to piece together the blocks she finds leads her on a journey full of life lessons about life, love, and even death and how a love for quilting can bind generations.
The book also includes instructions to recreate Alice's quilt for yourself.

Family and love, death, history

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3rd-6thUnder the Quilt of Night
Author: Deborah Hopkinson
Illustrator: James E. Ransome
Quiltmaker: Jennifer Greer
The story is about slaves running for freedom with the help of the Underground Railroad and the help of other people and a quilt.History

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Click on image to enlarge

7th - 12thMartha Anne's Quilt for Queen Victoria
Author: Kyra E. Hicks
Illustrator: Lee Edward Fodi
Quiltmaker: Patty Hambrick
Martha Ann loved the one chore the most, the dropping into the red box. Martha Ann was born about 1817 in eastern Tennessee. Nobody in American Colonization Society, the groups that help blacks starts a new life in Liberia. When Martha Ann and her family sailed to Liberia, the American Colonization Society, on which he and the boys built a house. African fever swept through town, and with it “I want to stay here and go to school.” Martha Ann never wanted to be swept away again and get long hard hours without pay. Sion, I know how I can make Papa and Mama proud of me. I know how I can make them pay for me. Gotorah and his tribesman started shooting at the mission and she quickly grabbed for the red tin box. Martha Ann bravely loaded muskets with bullets. Next, Martha Ann cried when Sion died and she lived alone, until she met and married Henry Ricks. I will have a very fine gift for her. Martha Ann spent weeks looking for a suitable fabric. Well, many years passed and Martha Ann met with Mrs. Jane Roberts, the wife of Liberia’s first president. The people rallied for Martha Ann, as she visited with her Victoria, Queen of Great Britain. Martha Ann said I don’t have much but I hope that you will cherish this gift. It was the gift of the Coffee Tree quilt.
History, slavery, quilt for Queen, non-fiction
Click for PDF of Lesson

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7th - 12thThe Quilt Trilogy: A Stitch in Time - Book 1
Author: Ann Rinaldi Illustrator: No illustrations Quiltmaker: Janie Stokes
Something is simmering beneath the surface in the Chelmsford house in Salem, Massachusetts. There are many unresolved hurts and betrayals breaking the family apart. Hannah divides the family quilt into three parts -one
for each of the two sisters to take with her on a trip. Abigail will
take a section with her to sea, and Thankful will take her section west
to Ohio with her father. Hannah will stay at home and continue to work on
her section. Ann Rinaldi explores the disintegration of the family and begins the first of novel in a trilogy exploring three generations of Chelmsfords.
Post-Revolutionary
Click for PDF Lesson Plan

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7th - 12thThe Quilt Triology: Broken Days - Book 2
Author: Ann Rinaldi Illustrator: No illustrations
Quiltmaker: Helen D. Best
Set in Massachusetts in the turbulent days prior to the War of 1812, this sequel to A Stitch in Time (Scholastic, 1994) revolves around Walking Breeze, the half-Shawnee daughter of Thankful Chelmsford. When her mother dies, the 14-year-old girl finds a home with her relations in Salem, a starchy New England community that bears no resemblance whatsoever to the Shawnee village in which she grew up. Walking Breeze and the Chelmsfords not only deal with a clash of cultures, but also with Cousin Ebie's accusation that the newcomer is not Thankful's daughter. After many interruptions for Indian uprisings, battles on the high seas, and sundry domestic crises, she is vindicated. The characterization of Walking Breeze is credible in so far as it depicts the struggle of a Native American caught between two worlds; however, her dialogue is less than convincing, alternating between standard English and Tonto-like utterances. The portrait of Ebie as an insecure and jealous teen rings true. Although the plot is too busy for much depth, it will appeal to readers who prefer action to reflection. Rinaldi provides an accurate historical backdrop as she did in A Break with Charity (Harcourt, 1992), but this story lacks the substance and intensity of that fine novel.?Pat Katka, San Diego Public Library
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Broken Days is a very good book, about growing up in the Chelmsford family. The Chelmsfords consisted of 5 children, three girls and 2 boys. This book is narrated by the youngest child's daughter, Ebie. Ebie's grandfather is stiff and gruff, and seems to have no love for Ebie. His favorite child,Thankful, dissapeared about 20 years ago, and he has missed her tremendously ever since. When Thankful's daughter shows up at the Chelmfords, nobody believes that she is a Chelmsford, except Ebie. Years ago, before Thankful's daughter and Ebie were ever born, the three daughters, Hannah, Abby, and Thankful, made a family quilt. If Walking Breeze, Thankful's daughter, had Thankful's piece of the quilt, nobody would question her. Everybody would know she was a Chelmsford. Ebie saw the quilt, and got jealous that her grandfather would love Walking Breeze, not her. So, Ebie decicdes to get rid of the quilt, knowing what shame will hang over her. Not Rinaldi's best book, but not her worst at all. This book is an excellant book, showing what life in the 1810's was like, when someone walked right in on your family, disturbing everything. I recommend this book to anybody who loves historical fiction, or anybody who likes to read what growing up in another time was like. Like most of Rinaldi's books, Broken Days is about coming of age, in some way or another.
Click for online lesson plan

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7th - 12thThe Quilt Trilogy: The Blue Door - Book 3
Author: Ann Rinaldi Illustrator: No illustrations
Quiltmaker: Doris T. Evans
This story revolves around three generations in Nathaniel Chelmsford’s family. Amanda, granddaughter of Abigail and Nate Videau is asked by her father and grandmother to deliver cotton bails to her great grandfather Nathaniel in Massachusetts. While traveling on a steamboat, the boiler exploded and the ship caught on fire. Amanda was the only survivor who saw the person responsible for the explosion, Nicholas Rhordan. Nicholas threatened to kill Amanda is she ever revealed that he was in the boat, and also stole grandma Abigail’s quilt from her. When Amanda went to meet her great grandfather Nathaniel no one believed who she was since she could not prove she was a Chelmsford. She was forced to work on the mill and live the hard life of a mill worker. Through her relationship with Nancy (Walking Breeze, her second cousin) she accomplished what her grandma truly sent her to do: return the quilt home and help people when you have the power to do it.
Colonists, Indians
Click for PDF lesson plan