7th – 12th Grade

Book Cover & QuiltTitleAuthor/IllustratorSynopsisTopicsLesson Plan

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Martha Anne's Quilt for Queen Victoria
Author: Kyra E. Hicks
Illustrator: Lee Edward Fodi
Quiltmaker: Patty Hambrick
Martha Ann loved the one chore the most, the dropping into the red box. Martha Ann was born about 1817 in eastern Tennessee. Nobody in American Colonization Society, the groups that help blacks starts a new life in Liberia. When Martha Ann and her family sailed to Liberia, the American Colonization Society, on which he and the boys built a house. African fever swept through town, and with it “I want to stay here and go to school.” Martha Ann never wanted to be swept away again and get long hard hours without pay. Sion, I know how I can make Papa and Mama proud of me. I know how I can make them pay for me. Gotorah and his tribesman started shooting at the mission and she quickly grabbed for the red tin box. Martha Ann bravely loaded muskets with bullets. Next, Martha Ann cried when Sion died and she lived alone, until she met and married Henry Ricks. I will have a very fine gift for her. Martha Ann spent weeks looking for a suitable fabric. Well, many years passed and Martha Ann met with Mrs. Jane Roberts, the wife of Liberia’s first president. The people rallied for Martha Ann, as she visited with her Victoria, Queen of Great Britain. Martha Ann said I don’t have much but I hope that you will cherish this gift. It was the gift of the Coffee Tree quilt.
History, slavery, quilt for Queen, non-fiction
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The Quilt Trilogy: A Stitch in Time - Book 1
Author: Ann Rinaldi Illustrator: No illustrations
Quiltmaker: Janie Stokes
Something is simmering beneath the surface in the Chelmsford house in Salem, Massachusetts. There are many unresolved hurts and betrayals breaking the family apart. Hannah divides the family quilt into three parts -one
for each of the two sisters to take with her on a trip. Abigail will
take a section with her to sea, and Thankful will take her section west
to Ohio with her father. Hannah will stay at home and continue to work on
her section. Ann Rinaldi explores the disintegration of the family and begins the first of novel in a trilogy exploring three generations of Chelmsfords.
Post-Revolutionary
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The Quilt Trilogy: The Blue Door - Book 3
Author: Ann Rinaldi Illustrator: No illustrations
Quiltmaker: Doris T. Evans
This story revolves around three generations in Nathaniel Chelmsford’s family. Amanda, granddaughter of Abigail and Nate Videau is asked by her father and grandmother to deliver cotton bails to her great grandfather Nathaniel in Massachusetts. While traveling on a steamboat, the boiler exploded and the ship caught on fire. Amanda was the only survivor who saw the person responsible for the explosion, Nicholas Rhordan. Nicholas threatened to kill Amanda is she ever revealed that he was in the boat, and also stole grandma Abigail’s quilt from her. When Amanda went to meet her great grandfather Nathaniel no one believed who she was since she could not prove she was a Chelmsford. She was forced to work on the mill and live the hard life of a mill worker. Through her relationship with Nancy (Walking Breeze, her second cousin) she accomplished what her grandma truly sent her to do: return the quilt home and help people when you have the power to do it.
Colonists, Indians
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The Quilt Triology: Broken Days - Book 2
Author: Ann Rinaldi Illustrator: No illustrations
Quiltmaker: Helen D. Best
Set in Massachusetts in the turbulent days prior to the War of 1812, this sequel to A Stitch in Time (Scholastic, 1994) revolves around Walking Breeze, the half-Shawnee daughter of Thankful Chelmsford. When her mother dies, the 14-year-old girl finds a home with her relations in Salem, a starchy New England community that bears no resemblance whatsoever to the Shawnee village in which she grew up. Walking Breeze and the Chelmsfords not only deal with a clash of cultures, but also with Cousin Ebie's accusation that the newcomer is not Thankful's daughter. After many interruptions for Indian uprisings, battles on the high seas, and sundry domestic crises, she is vindicated. The characterization of Walking Breeze is credible in so far as it depicts the struggle of a Native American caught between two worlds; however, her dialogue is less than convincing, alternating between standard English and Tonto-like utterances. The portrait of Ebie as an insecure and jealous teen rings true. Although the plot is too busy for much depth, it will appeal to readers who prefer action to reflection. Rinaldi provides an accurate historical backdrop as she did in A Break with Charity (Harcourt, 1992), but this story lacks the substance and intensity of that fine novel.?Pat Katka, San Diego Public Library
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Broken Days is a very good book, about growing up in the Chelmsford family. The Chelmsfords consisted of 5 children, three girls and 2 boys. This book is narrated by the youngest child's daughter, Ebie. Ebie's grandfather is stiff and gruff, and seems to have no love for Ebie. His favorite child,Thankful, dissapeared about 20 years ago, and he has missed her tremendously ever since. When Thankful's daughter shows up at the Chelmfords, nobody believes that she is a Chelmsford, except Ebie. Years ago, before Thankful's daughter and Ebie were ever born, the three daughters, Hannah, Abby, and Thankful, made a family quilt. If Walking Breeze, Thankful's daughter, had Thankful's piece of the quilt, nobody would question her. Everybody would know she was a Chelmsford. Ebie saw the quilt, and got jealous that her grandfather would love Walking Breeze, not her. So, Ebie decicdes to get rid of the quilt, knowing what shame will hang over her. Not Rinaldi's best book, but not her worst at all. This book is an excellant book, showing what life in the 1810's was like, when someone walked right in on your family, disturbing everything. I recommend this book to anybody who loves historical fiction, or anybody who likes to read what growing up in another time was like. Like most of Rinaldi's books, Broken Days is about coming of age, in some way or another.
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